Archive for the 'Technology' Category

Light camera

The Light Story from light on Vimeo.

Vital Resource

The Institute of Network Cultures has had a site refresh, and it’s a good excuse, if any were needed, to look through their amazing resources for anyone with a critical interest in the internet and digital networked technologies. Many of the books are available as download.

Act Now

Four days of exhibition, workshops, lectures, artist talks, panel discussions, performances, and screenings. Bringing together leading Asian and international talent to share, collaborate, and inspire. More: http://actcenter.kr / Site and identity by Moniker (check it out).

The Internet’s Own Boy

Monday 31 August, 6pm, Barnes Lecture Theatre.
A screening of The Internet’s Own Boy: The Story of Aaron Swartz

The film follows the story of programming prodigy and information activist Aaron Swartz. From Swartz’s help in the development of the basic internet protocol RSS to his co-founding of Reddit, his fingerprints are all over the internet. But it was Swartz’s groundbreaking work in social justice and political organizing combined with his aggressive approach to information access that ensnared him in a two-year legal nightmare. It was a battle that ended with the taking of his own life at the age of 26. Aaron’s story touched a nerve with people far beyond the online communities in which he was a celebrity. This film is a personal story about what we lose when we are tone deaf about technology and its relationship to our civil liberties.

Highly recommended. Chance for a monday night catch-up.

Also note the Art School I/O excellent summer courses.

Google Vol. 1

A volume containing the entire dictionary represented by the first image result returned by Google images for each word. Review by Daniel Bennewith Gray.

Brendan Dawes Talk // Don’t Miss It

brendan

Brendan Dawes will be speaking on Thursday 23rd April 2015

Time: 11:30 – 12:45pm
Venue: The Barnes Building.

Brendan Dawes is a key figure in the development of digital media in the UK, and globally.
www.brendandawes.com

Brendan Dawes is a designer exploring the interaction of objects, people, technology and art using an eclectic mix of digital and analog materials.

Ever since his first experiences with the humble ZX81 back in the early eighties, Brendan has continued to explore the interplay of people, code, design and art through his work for various clients and on brendandawes.com where he publishes ideas, toys and projects created from an eclectic mix of digital and analog materials. His work is featured in the permanent collection of The Museum of Modern Art in New York and is a Visiting Teaching Fellow at the Manchester School of Art.

Screen Filming Film Screening

Florian kindly sent me the documentation from a project/workshop that he did at Weimar last year, run by Mark Prendergast. Totally of interest to anyone currently doing the (un)Special Effects brief.

Medieval Modernity

medievalmodernity.today

medievalmodernity.today — an Embassy project by viscomdes person Aaron McLaughlin.

On Memory

Lunch Bytes Dublin, of possible interest re: current projects.

Eyes Wide Open

I’m interested in the links between projects like Médor (link via Eric of OSP), and recent discussions in Scotland about independent investigative journalism. This was the subject of a really interesting discussion that Bella Caledonia hosted just prior to the referendum, and something that the Scottish Inquirer are, amongst others, looking to develop further. Peter Geohagan is also interesting to follow on these topics.

Potted History

Edwin Pickstone: ‘A potted history of the alphabet and its designs’

Edwin Pickstone: ‘A potted history of the alphabet and its designs’
Principal Seminar Room 1, Reid Building, 14 Jan 2015, 1pm

Looking at the histories of type design, Pickstone will speak about particular fonts linked to works in the exhibition, including Eric Gill Gill Sans and Alasdair Gray.

All welcome, no need to book

via ‘A potted history of the alphabet and its designs’.

Part of Spheres of Influence II.

Share alike

“In a sense, an “immoral” and a “moral” approach to data attribution are equally difficult to justify. When we make anything in human culture, we’re using the whole damned apparatus. We should either thank everyone, or thank no-one and just get on with making the stuff and putting it out there. Bending the semantic rays as they pass endlessly though our machines.”

via This is something I’ve planned to do for a while:… – Mrs Tsk *.

Process and Craft

IMG_8216

We did a Conditional Design workshop recently, as part of the Feral Studio *If,Then* events. And I just happened across this video, coincidentally, prompted by a couple of questions from Sam. I thought it was worth posting as it’s relevant in terms of the discussion that might, or could, be generated from the previous post about ‘craft’.

via ▶ Dutch Profiles

What Eric, Gijs and OSP Are Up To

osp presents Visual Culture a Tool for Design Collaboration — KissKissBankBank.

Navdy / Early 2015

if,then.

Screen Shot 2014-10-13 at 09.19.49

if,then. 20-23 Oct. A week of interactive interaction design workshops. By Art School i/0 and A Feral Studio.

Real-time times two

Recently I have been hooked on two websites which are (un)related real-time updates of digital (mis)communication.

The first is a site created by Norse, an internet attack intelligence agancy (very Neuromancer but without the rastas in space). The site is a real-time visualisation of a small percentage (apparently <1%) of cyber attacks. It shows where the attacks originate, where is being targeted and the type of attack. It is pretty incredible. If you watch it for long enough you’ll see the map quieten down and then, boom, a massive coordinated attack will fire off. Usually against the USA.

The second site is a real-time visualisation of every emoji being used on twitter. I find it mesmerising. It follows on from an article I read in The Observer last weekend which was interested in the popularity of Emoji and how it has become a ubiquitous virtual language, with pictograms replacing words and combinations of these symbols replacing whole sentences but adding a multitude of increased interpretations. As the author of the article writes at the end of the article, “Barthes would have had a field day.”

Both of the sites are socially interesting and although at first glance I think it seems that the Norse one is the more ‘important’ of the two, I am fascinated by the Emoji one and by the questions it raises about how we communicate digitally, why are we always more drawn towards using pictures (pun intended), what does this mean for words and writing, is the majority of written language superfluous to communicative needs, can we call emoji a recognised language in its own right, and how would a shift towards a pictorial-based language system affect things like journalism, poetry, books etc, and physical interaction? Its a highly unlikely thing to happen but it is interesting to think about.

http://map.ipviking.com/

http://www.emojitracker.com/

http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2014/aug/31/emoji-became-first-global-language

 

Tools

«Approaching a practice then means approaching it as it diverges, that is, feeling its borders, experimenting with the questions which practitioners may accept as relevant, even if they are not their own questions, rather than posing insulting questions that would lead them to mobilise and transform the border into a defence against their outside.»

Isabelle Stengers, «Introductory Notes on an Ecology of Practices»

via — LGRU Reader, (via a tip-off from Com Des person Gareth Lindsay), and with contributions by, amongst others, OSP.

Uji

Ivor Williams, vis com des person and visiting tutor, launches Uji. Using the wall-clock archetype, this device responds to the heartbeat of the owner/user. The project stems from Ivor’s work and research at Fabrica, and he talks about the project on Dezeen, here.

Why design cannot remain exclusive

The Open Design Now website is well designed. I have the book (available for loan, as are other books), but hadn’t seen the site before. A useful and interesting resource.