Archive for the 'Fabricating/Making' Category

Make Work Data Work

feral_makeworks

On Wed 21st October, Studio 223 at SWG3 will host a very informal Feral Studio / Make Works event, with Open Work presenting some ideas they’ve been developing using Make Works databases of makers and manufacturers. It’s a 5-way collab. The best kind of collab.

The second part of the evening might involve a making and manufacturing Pecha Kucha Roulette, featuring some of Glasgow’s hottest designers and makers (if we can get it together).

6 for 6.30pm start.

Source: Make Work Data Work – A Feral Studio

Getting things Made

Make Works is an excellent directory of fabricators, factories, manufacturers and makers. Set up by GSA Product Design Graduate Fi Scott, Make Works is a fantastic resource if you need to get ‘stuff’ ‘done’.

Craft Manifesto

The Crafts Council today launches its Education Manifesto. There’s a good debate to be had around ideas of craft. Does it encompass all aspects of making? And while it might seem a superficial question, does the deference to a sort of ‘keep calm and carry on’ visual language help widen out that debate?

Feral Past, Present, Future

Feral Past, Present, Future – A Feral Studio

Feral Studio Updates: An excellent resource from Lizzie Malcolm (who ran the patterns and parameters workshop, AFS001) is available online here, with a timeline of the work produced, alongside research reference points and template scripts. (You can also see some images of the public event, courtesy of Kirstin Kerr). Meanwhile, workshop 002 with Nik Roy is underway, and later this evening there’ll be a public event at the Lighthouse. Next week we look forward to welcoming Europa for a workshop, followed by a talk with Robert and Mia from Europa and David Bellingham at South Block. Then it’s a long winter break until we’re back on Garnethill.

Image: Alice Rooney

Many Hands Symposium

8 Many Hands Symposium

On Friday evening (23rd Aug), Vis-Com-Des person Alec Farmer will be hosting  Many Hands Symposium at the Lighthouse. Also a good chance to see the exhibition if you’ve not seen it already.

Good things from Singapore (Now Japan)

Vanguard specialises in the design of unique one-off bicycles, as well as in the customization and restoration of classic rides and collectors’ pieces. Vanguard bicycles are recognised worldwide for their unique designs and ergonomics. Originally from Singapore, Vanguard has recently moved its base to Niseko, Japan. See more custom bike designs here.

Sean & Jacinta, who make the bikes are friends of the GSA course in Singapore and gave a great lecture on their passion for Velos last year to the students.

MakLab Glasgow

Our friends at MakLab, Scotland’s first open access digital fabrication workshop, have been chosen as a finalist for the Google UK Global Impact Awards with nine other innovative social enterprises from the UK. If you would like to vote for them you can do so here, and help support this emerging facility for designers and makers.

Dominic Wilcox + MakLab – A Feral Studio

Dominic Wilcox + MakLab is the next Feral Studio event, tickets available from that link there. Sign-up for the workshop, which will run on monday and tuesday (4th and 5th march) will be open at 10am tomorrow (Tues 26th Feb), to my usual email address.

http://www.aferalstudio.com/event/dominic-wilcox-maklab/

Spime Weapons

Defense distributed raise an interesting spectre of the point (in the not too distant future) when we will be able to access (any) object as data and fabricate it ourselves as a 3D printed object. In this case, their focus in the gun, (or as they call it the ‘personal defence system’). The project, as I’m sure it’s intended to do, raises a number of ethical and social issues, and while I personally feel that their libertarian manifesto is a bit muddled (not seeming to recognise individual and collective rights as being connected in any way), its interesting to think about whether we feel any different were we to contextualise this technology in the arab spring, or other recent uprisings, and how this makes us feel about the more traditional methods of arms manufacturing, distribution and control.

Thanks to the person from 2nd year who raised this in a discussion group (and whose name unfortunately I don’t have to hand), as i think it raises some really interesting questions.

Printer Resources for Independent Art Publishers

Thanks to Keith for sending in a link to Printer Resources for Independent Art Publishers, which does exactly what it says on the tin.

2012: When (live) surface was depth

Kickstarter bans renderings; adding to the increasingly difficult debate about what is ‘real’. Does it matter if a designers portfolio consists of entirely ‘faked’ live surface visuals? (Thanks to David for the post title).

MESH Print Club at The Telfer

MESH Print Club :
The Telfer
.

Exhibition and Pop-up Shop
MESH Print Club (NL)
Exhibition Schedule:

Preview
Friday 17th August
6 – 9pm

Open
Saturday 18th & Sunday 19th August
11am – 5pm
Tuesday 21st – Friday 24th August
2-7pm daily
Saturday 25th August
11am-5pm

Mesh Print Club is a Rotterdam based print studio, founded in 2010 by Sander van Loon, Merijn van Essen and Rens van den Berge. It provides a platform for experimentation and exchanging knowledge of various print techniques. Mesh currently has around 70 members, amongst which graphic designers, illustrators and fashion designers.

The Telfer Gallery is proud to host its first international collaboration which will comprise the exhibiting and selling of 14 of Mesh’s finest screenprints.

Vis Com 12 Degree Show

Vis Com 12 is the website of this years graduating 4th year students. And representing as it does, a fantastically diverse body of works, has the most tags of any post on the vis-com blog ever.

Occupy Design?

Folk might be interested in this forthcoming event: I personally have some questions about the idea of ‘occupy design’ but undoubtedly the event will be a melting pot of ideas and proposals and one which could lead to some interesting outcomes.

‘This Space Is Not For Hire’ will take place at the Bank of Ideas, an occupied former bank near Liverpool Street Station.

Running across the afternoons of Saturday the 28 and Sunday 29 January 2012, will be a range of talks on topics such as: radical forms of communication and design activism; the precariousness of design employment; and exposing and reflecting upon the ways design is used to give a friendly veneer to the worst kinds of Corporate behaviour.

via Eye blog » Higher ground. Occupy Design is an opportunity to change design, and design for change..

On ‘Thinkering’

From States of Design 03: Domus.

Talk to Me

Talk to Me is the latest exhibition from Design and the Elastic Mind curator Paola Antonelli. This coincides with a recent purchase of mine, a HP desktop printer/scanner which not only talks to me (giving me printing ‘tips’ via its built-in lcd screen), but via its own I.P. address and a wireless connection to the network, talks to Hewlett Packard HQ… about me? about what I print? about how I’m not very good at loading the paper? The Internet of Things is well and truly here.

A Domus review nicely summarises some of the key questions;

“In the catalogue text, these changes are read along the long wave of opposition to cold 20th century rationalism: “The clichés of the twentieth century, such as ‘form follows function’, the modernist motto borrowed with some variation by Louis H. Sullivan, and ‘design means solving problems’… have been responsible for soulless and lobotomized architectural design.” On the contrary, the experiences shown in Talk To Me go back to the 1960s and the fruitful experiences of the radicals with their first ideas regarding cybernetic, mobile and interactive architecture.”

via Talk to Me – Design – Domus.

Gorbals Skirmishes

Skirmishes have organised for a mobile FABLAB to visit Glasgow on Friday 6th May 2010 — you can get more details at www.skirmishes.org/?p=292 The duo who run the van will have traveled from the Netherlands…

Bring an idea of something to make, or a project to share that shows how useful digital fabrication can be! They would like to make this event into a handy meet up for the wide community of makers in Glasgow, to share, learn and make, in the same way that we could in the Glasgow Fablab (AKA Maklab). It will also be a great opportunity for those who are unfamiliar with these tools and methods to experience the fablab and get a sense of what it could be used for.

The event is an informal drop in and forms part of Skirmishes Edge City design charette being held on the same day [http://www.skirmishes.org/?p=263].

The details:
St Francis Community Center, 405 Cumberland Street. Gorbals. Glasgow. G5 0YT.

Piloti’s Nooks and Corners

Private Eye’s Piloti has kindly granted me a three month licence to reproduce this article about the Stephen Holl building project .

Glasgow School of Art, designed as part of a competition in 1896 by Charles R. McIntosh, then a young assistant in the Glasgow firm of Honeyman & Keppie, is one of the most famous buildings in the world.

This subtle and eclectic stone structure, with its echoes of Scottish castles, Elizabethan architecture and “Queen Anne” and Arts and Crafts buildings in England, is gawped at constantly by hordes of starstruck architects. Its creator, “Rennie Mackintosh”, as he became known, has become a figure of myth as well as the patron saint of the Glasgow tourist industry. And two years ago, to mark the centenary of this truly wonderful work of architecture, the school announced a competition for an adjacent new building to replace the brutal concrete tower which the Mackintosh successor firm, Keppie Henderson & Partners, contrived to erect on the opposite side of Renfrew Street in 1970, when Glasgow was busy destroying itself.

Any new building on this sensitive site might be expected to respond to the character of the city and be deferential to poor old Toshie’s masterpiece. But no. Faced with 150 entries, including several from respected Scottish practices, the assessors surrendered to cultural cringe by plumping for a fashionable international superstar, Steven Holl of New York.

Holl paints as well as designs and is responsible for modishly angular and arbitrary new museum buildings in places like China, Norway and the US. He says things like: “Building transcends physical requirements by fusing with a place, by gathering the meaning of a situation.” But Holl has come up with a design which is scarcely respectful to Mackintosh.

At least the new building will run along the street line of Renfrew Street and incorporates the 1930s Assembly Hall. But that’s as far as it goes. Holl’s creation will rise much higher than Mackintosh’s block and, by having the top storey jutting forward, will overshadow it.

Whereas the original block is carefully and delicately detailed, Holl’s is a crude composition of plain surfaces and awkward angles. Facing Mackintosh’s facade, with its big north-facing mullioned and transformed windows, Holl proposes a recessed “landscape loggia… that gives the school an exterior social core open to the city. Natural vegetation with some stonework routes water into a small recycling water pond which will also reflect dappled sunlight on to the ceiling inside” — which suggests he has little understanding of Glasgow’s weather, especially in winter.

Mackintosh managed to provide practical, well-lit studio spaces that still work. But Holl, who drones on about a “new language of light”, proposes to waste space by having “Driven Void’ light shafts” inside the building to provide “direct connectivity with the outside world through the changing intensity and colour of the sky.”

Worst of all is the fact that this banal conception will be “coated in a thin skin of matte glass referencing Mackintosh’s stone skin”, whatever that may mean. Holl denies that all this southfacing glass will reflect too much light on to the old building, for: “This material is almost like alabaster. It is soft, without reflection.” As the Iron Duke once said, if you believe that, you’ll believe anything. But why glass at all? The character of Glasgow is of stone, and it is not necessary to imitate Mackintosh’s style to produce architecture which could be both original and yet harmonious — as the original School of Art was to the neighbouring tenements and villas.

Depressingly, this crude and insensitive design has met virtually no criticism in Scotland. Of course it was clever of Holl to team up with the Glasgow office, run by Ian Alexander and Henry McKeown (both graduates of the school), of the firm of JM Architects (not to be confused with RMJM who recently hired Sir Fred Goodwin [Eye 12551), for in Glasgow nobody likes to rock the boat. Naturally Seona Reid, director of the School of Art, considers that “the inventive use of light, material and section make it a worthy companion to Mackintosh, a striking building of which we will all be immensely proud”; but there has been remarkably little dissent from kow-towing to the American superstar among her members of staff. Ranks have closed: the Charles Rennie Mackintosh Society has rolled over, as has the Royal Incorporation of Architects in Scotland. Naturally the city council is all in favour.

Almost the only dissent has come from the distinguished Scots film-maker and pioneer in the rehabilitation of once-despised Toshie, Murray Grigor, together with Professor William JR Curtis, the (English) historian of modernism and the author of studies of Le Corbusier. In an open letter to the governors of the school and its staff and students, Professor Curtis writes: “The Holl project is lacking in urbanity and would not be out of place in a business park in China or the USA, but it is completely alien to Glasgow with its grid, urban grain, and sombre facades in stone and glass. Above all it fails to harmonise with Mackintosh’s marvellous building opposite. To respond to a historical context does not mean copying the existing, but it does mean interacting at several levels from overall volumes, to proportions, to materials”. I could not have put it better myself.

If Steven Holl’s arrogant matte glass lump is built, it will not just be a waste of £50m but another of modern Glasgow’s far too numerous architectural foul-ups.

‘Piloti’

GLASGOW School of Art, designed as part of a competition in 1896 by Charles R. McIntosh, then a young assistant in the Glasgow firm of Honeyman & Keppie, is one of the most famous buildings in the world.

This subtle and eclectic stone structure, with its echoes of Scottish castles, Elizabethan architecture and “Queen Anne” and Arts and Crafts buildings in England, is gawped at constantly by hordes of starstruck architects. Its creator, “Rennie Mackintosh”, as he became known, has become a figure of myth as well as the patron saint of the Glasgow tourist industry. And two years ago, to mark the centenary of this truly wonderful work of architecture, the school announced a competition for an adjacent new building to replace the brutal concrete tower which the Mackintosh successor firm, Keppie Henderson & Partners, contrived to erect on the opposite side of Renfrew Street in 1970, when Glasgow was busy destroying itself.

Any new building on this sensitive site might be expected to respond to the character of the city and be deferential to poor old Toshie’s masterpiece. But no. Faced with 150 entries, including several from respected Scottish practices, the assessors surrendered to cultural cringe by plumping for a fashionable international superstar, Steven Holl of New York.

Holl paints as well as designs and is responsible for modishly angular and arbitrary new museum buildings in places like China, Norway and the US. He says things like: “Building transcends physical requirements by fusing with a place, by gathering the meaning of a situation.” But Holl has come up with a design which is scarcely respectful to Mackintosh.

At least the new building will run along the street line of Renfrew Street and incorporates the 1930s Assembly Hall. But that’s as far as it goes. Holl’s creation will rise much higher than Mackintosh’s block and, by having the top storey jutting forward, will overshadow it.

Whereas the original block is carefully and delicately detailed, Holl’s is a crude composition of plain surfaces and awkward angles. Facing Mackintosh’s facade, with its big north-facing mullioned and transformed windows, Holl proposes a recessed “landscape loggia… that gives the school an exterior social core open to the city. Natural vegetation with some stonework routes water into a small recycling water pond which will also reflect dappled sunlight on to the ceiling inside” — which suggests he has little understanding of Glasgow’s weather, especially in winter.

Mackintosh managed to provide practical, well-lit studio spaces that still work. But Holl, who drones on about a “new language of light”, proposes to waste space by having “Driven Void’ light shafts” inside the building to provide “direct connectivity with the outside world through the changing intensity and colour of the sky.”

Worst of all is the fact that this banal conception will be “coated in a thin skin of matte glass referencing Mackintosh’s stone skin”, whatever that may mean. Holl denies that all this southfacing glass will reflect too much light on to the old building, for: “This material is almost like alabaster. It is soft, without reflection.” As the Iron Duke once said, if you believe that, you’ll believe anything. But why glass at all? The character of Glasgow is of stone, and it is not necessary to imitate Mackintosh’s style to produce architecture which could be both original and yet harmonious — as the original School of Art was to the neighbouring tenements and villas.

Depressingly, this crude and insensitive design has met virtually no criticism in Scotland. Of course it was clever of Holl to team up with the Glasgow office, run by Ian Alexander and Henry McKeown (both graduates of the school), of the firm of JM Architects (not to be confused with RMJM who recently hired Sir Fred Goodwin [Eye 12551), for in Glasgow nobody likes to rock the boat. Naturally Seona Reid, director of the School of Art, considers that “the inventive use of light, material and section make it a worthy companion to Mackintosh, a striking building of which we will all be immensely proud”; but there has been remarkably little dissent from

kow-towing to the American superstar among her members of staff. Ranks have closed: the Charles Rennie Mackintosh Society has rolled over, as has the Royal Incorporation of Architects in Scotland. Naturally the city council is all in favour.

Almost the only dissent has come from the distinguished Scots film-maker and pioneer in the rehabilitation of once-despised Toshie, Murray Grigor, together with Professor William JR Curtis, the (English) historian of modernism and the author of studies of Le Corbusier. In an open letter to the governors of the school and its staff and students, Professor Curtis writes: “The Holl project is lacking in urbanity and would not be out of place in a business park in China or the USA, but it is completely alien to Glasgow with its grid, urban grain, and sombre facades in stone and glass. Above all it fails to harmonise with Mackintosh’s marvellous building opposite. To respond to a historical context does not mean copying the existing, but it does mean interacting at several levels from overall volumes, to proportions, to materials”. I could not have put it better myself.

If Steven Holl’s arrogant matte glass lump is built, it will not just be a waste of £50m but another of modern Glasgow’s far too numerous architectural foul-ups.

‘Piloti’

Roy’s got a 3D Printer

Roy Mohan Shearer, previously a talker in Vis Com, has a new service using a MakerBot Thing-O-Matic 3D Printer Kit. Details below, might be a cost effective way of making prototypes. I believe GSA might also have this facility, though I’m not sure.

Affordable 3D Printing:

We can print your 3d model in hard plastic using our Makerbot
Thing-o-matic printer
[http://store.makerbot.com/makerbot-thing-o-matic.html].
The Thing-o-matic is a miniature factory that makes almost anything up
to 100mm x 100mm x 150mm out of ABS plastic.
Perfect for replacement parts, rough prototyping, and hacking-type activities!
Just email me an .stl file and some outside dimensions for a quote –
roy[at]zero-waste.co.uk or get in touch for more info.

New Media Scotland

Lots of interesting things to do during April, from New Media Scotland.