Archive for the 'Digital' Category

Make Work Data Work


On Wed 21st October, Studio 223 at SWG3 will host a very informal Feral Studio / Make Works event, with Open Work presenting some ideas they’ve been developing using Make Works databases of makers and manufacturers. It’s a 5-way collab. The best kind of collab.

The second part of the evening might involve a making and manufacturing Pecha Kucha Roulette, featuring some of Glasgow’s hottest designers and makers (if we can get it together).

6 for 6.30pm start.

Source: Make Work Data Work – A Feral Studio

Lunch Bytes

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Earlier this year I attended a Lunch Bytes conference at Haus der Kulturen der Welt in Berlin. (HKW generally puts on fantastic conferences at reasonable costs, and as such, is worth checking out). Also at the conference were vis-com-des people Sophie Dyer and Solveig Suess. The conference was a summary of other various symposia that have taken place under the Lunch Bytes banner (an initiative of the Goethe Institute) on the topic of Post-Internet Art. This is a highly contested term, and rather than try to write up what everyone said, (you can see the videos of the presentations here), I asked if Sophie and Solveig would be interested in exchanging questions and answers from the conference. They generously agreed, and that exchange can be read below.

Continue reading ‘Lunch Bytes’

Extempore Printing — Talk: Tue 13 Oct, 5pm at SWG3

Studio 223 are excited to announce their second resident in The Press, Gareth Lindsay, who will be discussing some of his work and his intentions for the residency during an informal chat at Studio 223 in SWG3. Gareth graduated from Communication Design at GSA in 2013 and lives in London. He is a freelance designer working with Europa, The Wire and most recently Housmans radical bookshop in Kings X. Through these various roles, Gareth works on books, booklets & leaflets, signing and shopfronts, exhibition design, magazine layout, various printed ephemera and even websites. More marginal activities include amateur cabinet making, sporadic lettering and minimal amounts of writing. Guests are welcome to join us after Gareth’s talk for a Pizza Party and Talks from the artists and designers who work in the studios at SWG3.

Source: Extempore Printing Tickets, Glasgow | Eventbrite

Vital Resource

The Institute of Network Cultures has had a site refresh, and it’s a good excuse, if any were needed, to look through their amazing resources for anyone with a critical interest in the internet and digital networked technologies. Many of the books are available as download.

Offscreen Magazine

Offscreen is a print based magazine about those that create on screen content. Designed in Melbourne, Printed in Berlin.

Google Vol. 1

A volume containing the entire dictionary represented by the first image result returned by Google images for each word. Review by Daniel Bennewith Gray.

When (live) Surface was Depth

Drag + Drop is an interesting article about making things appear ‘real’ (with some handy links to useful software). While undoubtedly this is an is an important part of articulating an idea, is there a tipping point where the impression of the surface of an idea is given greater importance than the idea itself? It also leads to a whole load of identikit portfolios conforming to some kind of weird non-offensive white studio loft apartment web browser archetypes.

Medieval Modernity — an Embassy project by viscomdes person Aaron McLaughlin.

On Memory

Lunch Bytes Dublin, of possible interest re: current projects.

Further Education

This thursday, at the CCA, (not at lunch time) this event looks at education through the prism of digital technology. Coincidentally by chance a nice compliment to our own Feral Studio event on tuesday late afternoon/evening. Come along to both, all welcome.

Share alike

“In a sense, an “immoral” and a “moral” approach to data attribution are equally difficult to justify. When we make anything in human culture, we’re using the whole damned apparatus. We should either thank everyone, or thank no-one and just get on with making the stuff and putting it out there. Bending the semantic rays as they pass endlessly though our machines.”

via This is something I’ve planned to do for a while:… – Mrs Tsk *.

Process and Craft


We did a Conditional Design workshop recently, as part of the Feral Studio *If,Then* events. And I just happened across this video, coincidentally, prompted by a couple of questions from Sam. I thought it was worth posting as it’s relevant in terms of the discussion that might, or could, be generated from the previous post about ‘craft’.

via ▶ Dutch Profiles

What Eric, Gijs and OSP Are Up To

osp presents Visual Culture a Tool for Design Collaboration — KissKissBankBank.


Screen Shot 2014-10-13 at 09.19.49

if,then. 20-23 Oct. A week of interactive interaction design workshops. By Art School i/0 and A Feral Studio.

Real-time times two

Recently I have been hooked on two websites which are (un)related real-time updates of digital (mis)communication.

The first is a site created by Norse, an internet attack intelligence agancy (very Neuromancer but without the rastas in space). The site is a real-time visualisation of a small percentage (apparently <1%) of cyber attacks. It shows where the attacks originate, where is being targeted and the type of attack. It is pretty incredible. If you watch it for long enough you’ll see the map quieten down and then, boom, a massive coordinated attack will fire off. Usually against the USA.

The second site is a real-time visualisation of every emoji being used on twitter. I find it mesmerising. It follows on from an article I read in The Observer last weekend which was interested in the popularity of Emoji and how it has become a ubiquitous virtual language, with pictograms replacing words and combinations of these symbols replacing whole sentences but adding a multitude of increased interpretations. As the author of the article writes at the end of the article, “Barthes would have had a field day.”

Both of the sites are socially interesting and although at first glance I think it seems that the Norse one is the more ‘important’ of the two, I am fascinated by the Emoji one and by the questions it raises about how we communicate digitally, why are we always more drawn towards using pictures (pun intended), what does this mean for words and writing, is the majority of written language superfluous to communicative needs, can we call emoji a recognised language in its own right, and how would a shift towards a pictorial-based language system affect things like journalism, poetry, books etc, and physical interaction? Its a highly unlikely thing to happen but it is interesting to think about.


Educational Type

The Sandberg Instituut discusses its new typeface and website, quoting Herman Zapf (1968);

“Electronics will soon force its claim on letterforms, and let us hope it will liberate us from the dust of the past.”


«Approaching a practice then means approaching it as it diverges, that is, feeling its borders, experimenting with the questions which practitioners may accept as relevant, even if they are not their own questions, rather than posing insulting questions that would lead them to mobilise and transform the border into a defence against their outside.»

Isabelle Stengers, «Introductory Notes on an Ecology of Practices»

via — LGRU Reader, (via a tip-off from Com Des person Gareth Lindsay), and with contributions by, amongst others, OSP.


Ivor Williams, vis com des person and visiting tutor, launches Uji. Using the wall-clock archetype, this device responds to the heartbeat of the owner/user. The project stems from Ivor’s work and research at Fabrica, and he talks about the project on Dezeen, here.

It’s sunny in Dundee mostly


Tentsmuir WW2 Coastal Defences

In the spirit of inter-institutional caring and sharing:


Preview: Thursday 27th March 7pm
Exhibition Open: Friday 28th March 12 – 4pm, Saturday 29th March 12 – 4pm

The White Room project space, Tin Roof Studios. 38-40 Bellfield Street
Dundee DD1 5JD

Presenting an exhibition of work created by 3rd year Illustration Students from Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art & Design.

Come along to our show! It consists of hand printed posters and set designs for a series of imagined theatrical adaptations of plays exploring climate change, sustainability, urban planning and related social and political issues.

Exploring subjects such as:
Hydro Fracking, Gentrification, Micro-topias, Climate Activism, Nuclear waste disposal, Nuclear War, Social Housing, The melting ice caps, Surveillance, Community Gardening.

For more information please visit:

Beauty is in the Stack: Michael Oswell and Scott King

Beauty is in the Stack: Michael Oswell and Scott King... Tickets, Glasgow - Eventbrite

Beauty is in the Stack: Michael Oswell and Scott King.

Part of the preview events for It’s Not Very Nice That, a forthcoming exhibition at the Lighthouse, Michael Oswell and Scott King will discuss their recent projects. This talk is the first in a series of events that run alongside the exhibition, and which will be posted on, when the organiser gets organised.

The exhibition opening follows the talk, to which everyone is very much invited.

Supported by the Design School, Glasgow School of Art

This event will take place in Gallery 1 at the Lighthouse. Doors 5:30pm.

Image: Libcom Anniversary Poster (Michael Oswell)